When an addition to a Minnesota native Carly Zucker's house created the opportunity to have a new walk-in closet all to herself, her designer Bria Hammel wasn't about to give her a boring, white box. "It's a room that's exclusively hers, so we wanted to create a really feminine, pretty space," says Hammel. "It feels cohesive with the rest of the house, but it's glamorous and girly, like her!"

This closet—built by John Kraemer & Sons—isn't just a pretty space though: Every square inch was designed with a purpose. Read on to find out how Hammel helped her client create the ultimate getting-ready room.

Design with you in mind.

Instead of following prescriptive rules about closet design—use this much room for hanging, have this many shelves for folded items—think about your particular wardrobe and lifestyle first. "We're very much seasonal dressers in Minnesota, so we worked with a closet designer to make sure that Carly could compartmentalize her clothing instead of having it all mixed together," says Hammel. "It makes it easier when you're not sorting through summer and winter dresses!"

Accessorize with hardware.

When Zucker asked to incorporate a pair of sliding barn doors into the design, "we wanted to figure out a way to have them make sense aesthetically with the rest of the closet," says Hammel. Her solution: Bring on the hardware. "The modern, clean-lined brass helped it feel more glam and not too farmhouse," Hammel explains.

Don't be afraid to put it all out there.

The matching islands feature clear glass insets with jewelry drawers beneath. "It's nice because you can always see where things are, but at the same time your jewelry is kept clean, and the glass provides a surface for packing a suitcase or setting things down," says Hammel.

When Zucker requested a place to display her covetable handbag collection, Hammel built a tower of clear glass shelves. "If you have things in boxes, you tend not to use them," she warns. "Being able to have an open display means she can just grab and go."

Keep it accessible.

The room's tall ceilings allow for lots of vertical storage, so Hammel designed a lightweight, easily-moveable step stool that matched the cabinetry to ensure that everything was still within reach. "It's also helpful for looking inside the jewelry case or reaching the middle of the island to clean it," says Hammel.

Use materials that hold up.

For the countertops, Hammel chose white Cambria quartz instead of marble or wood. "It's basically indestructible—plus, they're based in Minnesota!" Hammel adds.

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