Lifestyle
Lifestyle

Denim Experts on Whether or Not to Freeze Your…

You're well-versed in the history of denim and the new styles to wear for fall, but some jeans-related questions remain.

Kevin Costner Pays Tribute to His Dad on…

Kevin Costner plays John Dutton on Paramount Network's Yellowstone. The show, which is now in its second season, is cable's most-watched show for the second summer in a row. Kevin said that being on Yellowstone, which was recently picked up for season 3, "hasn't been an easy adjustment for him."There's more to John Dutton than meets the eye. When watching Yellowstone, it's easy to see Kevin Costner's character as no more than a rough-and-tumble kind of guy. Throughout the show's second season, however, the ranch owner is slowly (but surely) doing away with his tough-as-nails persona and giving Yellowstone fans a glimpse at the pain he's still grappling with after his wife Evelyn's death. To add more depth to John Dutton, Kevin went back to his roots.In fact, the ranching world portrayed in the hit Paramount Network series isn't all too different than his father's southern upbringing. William Costner, one of 11 children raised by Walter and Tig Costner, lived on a wheat farm in the panhandle of Oklahoma until the Great Depression and Dust Bowl took over. "It was the Great Depression, and our family would never recover: 50,000 bushels of wheat would spoil waiting for the price to go up and it never did. And the Dust Bowl that followed would roll over a generation," Kevin recounted while being inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers earlier this year. Like many ranchers and farmers during this time, his dad's only hope for survival was to move away from the drought-stricken Southern Plains. This led Kevin's father to Compton, California. "They were hard-bark people. He came and worked on the dams, and was discriminated against in California because they had taken jobs in the late 20s and 30s. He only had one job and was afraid to lose the job he had because he had seen so many men out of work," he said during a panel at 92Y in 2015.By the time Kevin was born, his parents had created "a Huckleberry family" of their own, relying on steady paying jobs in Compton, California to provide for their three kids. Still, Kevin's dad still made sure that his son understood where he came from and Kevin recalls being in constant awe of his father's grit. At 6, Kevin's family moved to San Paulo where he rode his friend's horse for the first time. "[My friend's] fascination with it didn’t run as deep as mine, probably because he’d had it his whole life, and when he didn’t want to ride it anymore, I would keep going while he watched or went inside," he confessed. At 7, he watched his first western movie on the big screen. When it came time for Kevin to make westerns of his own, his father's story helped him to get into character, especially for his most recent role as John Dutton. "He [My dad] was tough; he was a fighter; he could fight. And he taught me in a way that was designed to win," Kevin told The Hollywood Reporter. Now that Kevin's father is no longer alive, he carries on his father's (and grandfather's) legacy through his work in Yellowstone. During an interview on the Dan Patrick Show, he revealed that his character actually uses his dad's old .30-30 rifle. For the 64-year-old actor, this small gesture reminds him where it all started: on his grandparent's farm in the panhandle of Oklahoma. For can't-miss news, expert beauty advice, genius home solutions, delicious recipes, and lots more, sign up for the Good Housekeeping newsletter.Subscribe Now

Professional Chefs Challenged to Plate Carrots in…

How you plate food is almost as important as the food itself. We challenged Test Kitchen folks Brad, Molly, Andy, Priya, Chris, Gaby and Amiel to prepare and plate two full carrots in any way they wanted in just one minute.

Cardi B and Bernie Sanders got real about taxes…

Cardi B and Bernie Sanders got real about taxes, healthcare, and even their nails

The 25 Best Zombie Video Games

Do Caffeine-spiked Cosmetics Do Anything?

A cup of joe gets us going in the morning, so it’s natural to assume that caffeine will also wake up our skin. But that’s not really how it works. Here’s what the research says about caffeine-spiked cosmetics.

11 of the World’s Most Historically Significant…

Distinctive doors make a statement about the hidden wonders behind them. These 11 must-see historic doorways are architectural wonders in themselves.

100 Years of Girls' Clothing

Take a look back at the last hundred years of little girls' clothes. From the bright colors and patterns of the 1910s and apron accessories of the 1950s, to the allowance of trousers in school in the 1970s and the 'fashion-forward' kids' options of the 2000s here's girls' clothes transformed over the last century.

Ranking the Monsters from Scary Stories to Tell…

There was no shortage of terrifying monsters in the 2019 film adaptation of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, so join WatchMojo as we rank them the hellish creatures that terrorize the young residents of Mill Valley, Pennsylvania. From Harold the Scarecrow to the Toe Monster, childhood nostalgia has never been quite so terrifying.

Searching for the soul of Grand Lake | Colorful Colorado

There Are SO Many Hidden 'Beverly Hills, 90210…

When the first episode of BH90210 aired, diehard 90210 fans were overcome with nostalgia from their teen years: Color Me Badd's music, the very '90s fashion, and, well, a simpler time when iPhones didn't rule high school. When creating the show, Tori Spelling and Jennie Garth — yep, Donna Martin and Kelly Taylor — were aware that the reboot was a chance to attract a new, younger audience, but still a way to give their core fans the same look and feel of the original series. That's why, as Tori says, they sprinkled in "fan candy" (a.k.a Easter eggs) throughout Fox's six-episode run. If you're just discovering the wild and wonderful world of Beverly Hills (Welcome!) or are looking for another way to celebrate the good ol' days, check out how the new series references the original — and prepare to take a trip back to the 90s in 3, 2, 1...Tori spots a "Donna Martin Graduates" t-shirt.lmao that girl is wearing a donna martin graduates shirt as if that chant isn’t burned into my brain— angela (@buffyxpratts) August 8, 2019How Donna Martin graduated from West Beverly High remains a mystery, but one thing's for sure: The entire student body let their voices be heard to make sure "Donna Martin Graduates." Eventually, this phrase became a go-to on 90210-inspired merch. So much so, that one of the extras on BH90210 was cast wearing a "Donna Martin Graduates" shirt in "The Reunion" episode — and Tori Spelling couldn't help but point it out. "Look at that. I can't even pay my bills, but that show is cashing in on our faces," she says. Steve and Andrea attempt to exchange another egg. But did they bring a receipt? 🥚🧾 #BH90210 pic.twitter.com/88jhoLnu95— BH90210 (@BH90210) August 8, 2019During the season 2 episode called "U4EA" in the original series, Steve and Andrea attempt to exchange an egg in hopes of getting into an underground rave. Although they follow Emily Valentine's instructions to a tee, they go the wrong store, making their efforts unsuccessful. In the current show, Andrea jokes that she would "like to exchange this egg" after taking a look at her Peach Pit order. Color Me Badd's music continues to play. Folks, it’s not even a minute into #BH90210 and they’re playing Color Me Badd’s “All 4 Love.”Alright, I’m on board. pic.twitter.com/1ML4NA8YdU— Mike Beauvais (@MikeBeauvais) August 8, 2019Nineties R&B group Color Me Badd basically created the original 90210 soundtrack. Remember when they serenaded the girls at the Peach Pit with "I Adore Mi Amore?" Or when the band checked into the Bel Age during season 2, causing mayhem in Beverly Hills? This time around, Donna and David get nostalgic while Color Me Badd roars through the speakers. "Do you remember when we used to make out to this song underneath the bleachers," Donna asked David in a dream sequence during BH90210's first episode. Brandon and Kelly at the Peach Pit. Brandon and Kelly happily married and co-owning the Peach Pit is the content I am 100% here for #BH90210— Liv (@stevenrogered) August 8, 2019BH90210 kicks off right where 90210 left off: the Peach Pit. During a dream sequence at the very start of the reboot, Brandon Walsh and Kelly Taylor own the retro-style diner. The whole gang — Steve, Andrea, Donna, and David — are in their usual spots with megaburgers in hand. Donna steals her red dress. That’s my dress! #BH90210 https://t.co/LIDfGFMxY1— Tori Spelling (@torispelling) August 8, 2019 Yes, that dress. In "The Pitch," Tori rightfully takes back — okay, steals — her poofy red dress that she wore to the spring dance. "That's my dress," she yells. Kelly's dream sequence calls out her most memorable scenes.BH90210's second episode "The Pitch" kicked off with a major '90s flashback: Kelly, black choker and all, running through the halls of West Beverly High. While in a daze, all of the show's main characters approach her with one-liners, which reference key moments throughout the show's tenure:A grown-up Donna asks, "Kel! Are you okay? I heard Tara held you at gunpoint!,"which references the sixth season of 90210 where Tara (played by Paige Boss) becomes dangerously obsessive with Kelly.Alluding to the time in season 3 that Kelly passed out after taking diet pills, Brandon says: "Are you on diet pills again? We talked about this!" Steve ironically warns Kelly to stay away from frat parties, even though she was burned in a fire at a rave that he hosted in season 5: "Hey, if you go to that frat party, you're gonna get burned."Following the fire, Kelly nearly joined a cult called The New Evolution — and Andrea wasn't having it. "You have to quit The New Evolution! They're brainwashing you," an older Andrea says.David plays "Listen To Your Heart" by Roxette, which is his way of remembering Kelly's iconic "I choose me" moment at the end of season 5.For can't-miss news, expert beauty advice, genius home solutions, delicious recipes, and lots more, sign up for the Good Housekeeping newsletter.Subscribe Now

The 12 Best Islands in the World

Make sure to pack your sunglasses and bathing suits before vacationing at one of these 12 breathtaking islands around the world.

This first-edition set of Pokemon cards sold for…

This first-edition set of Pokemon cards was sold for $107,000 at auction. They were in mint condition.

Inside Margot Robbie's Los Angeles Office Space

Actress Margot Robbie takes us on a tour of her production company LuckyChap's Los Angeles headquarters. This beach inspired office space features a rustic kitchen, full service 'bourgy' bathroom and Western-themed courtyard.

Inside a $20M Hamptons Home with a Massive…

We're back in the Hamptons to visit Flying Point Compound, a $20M property that's currently on the market. This compound features a beautiful recreated barn complete with a gigantic living room, kitchen, conservatory and a basement theater, gym, spa and game room. And that's just the barn. The entire property features the finest landscaping and artwork, guesthouses, a garden, a tennis court and a main house that leaves nothing to be desired.

Milo Ventimiglia Hijacks a Stranger's Phone

Milo Ventimiglia hijacks a superfan's phone and social media accounts including Snapchat, Tinder, Instagram and more apps. Can Milo fine the perfect match in her Tinder DMs? Will her mom ever text back? Will Milo find the right font color for her Instastory? See Milo Ventimiglia in "The Art of Racing in the Rain" in theaters now.

Adobe Theater presents whimsical fantasy 'Harvey'

Masterclass Co-Founder Launches Another Online…

Outlier is a new for-profit venture from Aaron Rasmussen that aims to replace universities' introductory-level courses with highly-produced educational online content.

Sick of the heat? Here's where you can find a…

It's the middle of summer, and you're probably indoors right now, a refugee from the unbearable heat. Maybe you're imagining a cool family vacation.

Why Your Parents Had a Better Retirement Than You…

Whether you're in your 20s or your 50s, your retirement is probably going to be harder to finance than your parents.

What a Registered Dietitian Really Thinks About…

On August 13, WW (formerly Weight Watchers) launched Kurbo, a program aimed at kids ages 8 to 17.The Kurbo program uses a stoplight system to rate the health content of food. Green light foods can be eaten at any time, yellow foods should be moderated, and red-light foods should be limited.The app costs $69 for one month, $189 for three months, or $294 for six months.At its launch, controversy erupted over whether young children should be on this type of plan. WW says it wants to curb childhood obesity; others cite the report by the American Academy of Pediatrics that show a link between obesity-prevention efforts and eating disorders.Earlier this week, WW launched a new healthy eating program called Kurbo aimed at kids ages 8 to 17, and the backlash has already begun. Which is understandable — anything that signals “stop” when it comes to food can easily be taken out of context or misused without the right tools to consider when or why they’re eating which foods, and how they want to feel most of the time. That said, I think there are two key points getting lost here: The first is that the tool itself is meant to support (not replace) the role of parents and caregivers in making healthier food choices. Second, it's critical to remember that — thanks to our smartphones — we’re bombarded with so-called health information and pseudo-scientific “advice” on what to eat 24/7 (and kids are certainly no exception). For tweens and teens, feeling like there are no accessible and trustworthy resources to help guide them to making better, more nutritious food choices can be extremely isolating, alienating, and frustrating — and if you're a parent with a complex food history, I can understand wanting to feel empowered to do better for yourself and your family. But I think the controversy itself sheds light on an important issue: Many of us feel utterly betrayed by the phrase “healthy eating.” If you have no idea which foods will actually make you feel energized and satisfied, then it’s pretty tough to grocery shop for yourself, much less your family, right? In a world where “diet” advice is extolled by everyone, everywhere, we all need more (free!) evidence-based nutritional information. Ultimately, anything you can do to cultivate a better, more holistic relationship with food is the right choice for you and your family.That said, here are some strategies that will help you make healthier choices for your kids, with or without the Kurbo app.Remember that what’s on the table is up to you. First things first: When it comes to encouraging healthier eating habits for your family, the single most important thing to remember is that parents are in charge of what’s on the menu; kids determine how much they want to eat. That’s why encouraging kids to eat more veggies and fruits is a simple and nutritious place to start. If you’re adding more of these foods to every meal and snack, you’re cultivating a positive connection between food and health.Language matters. One thing I recommend parents keep in mind is that restrictive language can beget restrictive behavior. The following words and phrases are all examples of ways some of us speak about food that can be damaging for kids and adults alike, but especially triggering for adolescents: Cut outEliminateLimitDon't eatEat lessPortion control Think about taking a hard look at the way you speak about food with your family, and how you make it clear that better health requires a mindset of inclusivity vs. exclusivity. Making family meals and planning activities that emphasize food enjoyment is what matters most. For example, take a walk through the farmer’s market and select a new, seasonal veggie to make for dinner, then cook it together at home. Making a meal more fun for both you and your kids is crucial when you’re introducing something new, no matter how old you are!Prioritize “whole” vs. “clean,” “fresh,” or “healthy.” I’d encourage parents, kids, or anyone looking to make more nutritious choices to reassess pre-made meals and snacks (and all of their myriad label claims) by considering wholesomeness above all else. Ask, “Is this close to the natural state of how this food was meant to be eaten?” For example, think oranges vs. orange juice; roasted potatoes vs. fried potato chips; peanuts vs. peanut butter ice cream; chocolate vs. chocolate milk; blueberries vs. blueberry jam, and so on. The more you think about your choices through this framework, the more likely you are to make the food choices that are right for you, and promote better eating habits for your family.Drink up. No matter how old you are, hydration is the key to better health. But it shouldn't feel like a chore! Flavor H2O with lemons, limes, or any citrus fruit; freeze fruit to use as ice cubes; use up produce leftovers for smoothies, soups, or sauces. Plus, high water volume foods are almost always more nutrient-dense, like unsweetened dairy products (Greek yogurt, milk) or produce (especially melons, carrots, zucchini, and tomatoes). Being properly hydrated can help you stay healthier overall, while feeling more satisfied and energized.Get rid of the guilt. Kids absorb parents’ habits, so if there’s one thing to “cut out” entirely, it’s the guilt, fear, and shame associated with eating meals, snacks, or treats that are more indulgent — especially since no single food (or snack or meal), in isolation from everything else, can make or break your health. Nor can it directly impact your weight (that goes for both you and your kids). And while the red/yellow/green “traffic light” approach has taken some heat, it’s worth thinking through how you can adopt that framework to consider what foods help you feel good and energized vs. cranky and energy-zapped — and why that matters so you can do more of the other things you truly love to do! (Though it's important to note, the traffic light language — e.g., “stop and think!”— is for parents and teachers, not kids.)For example: It may be tougher to do homework after drinking a milkshake (when blood sugar starts coming down). But it’s fun to go out with your family for a milkshake after a homemade meal, when your whole family can connect and enjoy the experience together (and you’re closer to bedtime). That’s one simple choice to make that both brings everyone together around the table, cultivates enjoyment and nourishment (of all types!), and can even build in a little activity (if you’re heading somewhere walkable). Ultimately, “good for you” and “bad for you” has no place in the vocabulary of kids, nor does it have a place in your own — so cut out the judgment and consider what makes you feel good and why. For can't-miss news, expert beauty advice, genius home solutions, delicious recipes, and lots more, sign up for the Good Housekeeping newsletter.Subscribe Now

Trying Everything on the Menu at Frankel's Deli

When it comes to New York City delis, it's hard to top Brooklyn's Frankel's Deli. Their cream cheeses are perfectly tangy and creamy, their bagels have ideal density and their whitefish, simply put, is a revelation. This place is so good, in fact, that we sent our very own Alex Delany to try one of everything on this menu. And we didn't send him alone. This time he's joined by Frankel's frequenter Molly Baz.