Rocks Glasses

Use rocks glasses when you want to muddle ingredients in the serving glass, and as a general rule for drinks served over ice balls or cubes. Aim for 6 to 8 fl. oz. If you think you need a double, it means you're drinking two cocktails at a time. Ice melts too quickly for that and dilutes the drink beyond what recipes intend, so buy a single and make the second drink when number one is gone. Cocktails are meant to be enjoyed quickly, after all. Example drinks: Old-Fashioned, Bramble, Negroni.

$30 for 6 glasses, amazon.com

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Collins Glasses

The Collins glass is so closely related to the Highball glass, which is slightly wider and squatter, that you only need one or the other. Because drinks fit for a Collins or Highball glass are served with lots of crushed ice, these should hold 10 to 12 fl. oz. Example drinks: Gin & Tonic, Tom Collins (get it?), Absinthe Frappé.

$20 for 6 glasses, amazon.com

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Coupe Glasses

Like rocks glasses, coupes are historically 6 to 8 fl. oz., but are used for drinks served without ice. After straining the cocktail into the glass, the liquid should settle just below the rim. These can replace martini glasses, which spill easily - and are out of fashion at the moment. Example drinks: Aviation, Sidecar, Blinker.

$34 for 6 glasses, amazon.com

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Ice-Making

Unless you're using a mallet and ice pick to chip your own cubes, spring for the ice trays. The 1.25-inch option is standard for ice used in mixing a cocktail.

$12, amazon.com

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For serving a cocktail over ice, buy the 2-inch ice ball mold; spheres melt slower than 2-inch cubes, and take longer to dilute your drink. Get two of each tray, because unless you're Canadian, you can never have too much ice. (Someday, you might even buy a Wintersmiths.)

$19, amazon.com

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Bar Spoon

Sometimes used as a measurement for syrupy ingredients–e.g. “one bar spoon of pomegranate syrup”–its main purpose is to stir drinks; 30 cm is the standard length for your standard-sized mixing glass. Too short and your sleeve cuffs will be taking alcohol baths, too long and you'll look like Pee-wee Herman mixing a drink.

$15, amazon.com

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Mixing Glass

At least a half-liter mixing glass is suitable. A decent glass will be thick enough that a metal bar spoon banging around inside won't shatter it. Just make sure it has a pour spout so that when you serve the drink, you empty it all into a glass and not onto the rug.

$20, amazon.com

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Shakers

Buy the Boston type, in which you hold together two parts that look like metal pint glasses. You can make all shaken drinks in these. Skip the cobbler-type with the built-in strainer and cap. It can't do anything better than the Boston shaker, except look cooler.

$17 for a set, amazon.com

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Hawthorne Strainer

The Hawthorne is your go-to tool for separating cocktails from extraneous ice and ingredient remnants as you pour from a mixing glass. It fits against the rim of the mixing glass like a lid.

$17, amazon.com

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Fine Mesh Strainer

Occasionally you need to filter out certain ingredient debris that slips past an ordinary strainer, like fruit shards and egg. The fine mesh strainer is held over the serving glass, and the ingredients are poured through. You won't use it often, but when you need to, it'll be the only thing that works.

$8, amazon.com

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Juice Press

Get a hand press for juicing limes and lemons, which go into many cocktail recipes. Avoid those with rubber grips, as juice can run between them and the metal and fester. Get a bigger one that can handle small oranges, too. The more crush, the better.

$13, amazon.com

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Jiggers

Japanese jiggers weren't originally Japanese, but when Western bartenders rediscovered their Japanese counterparts using them in the 2000s, they fell back in love with the two-sided measuring tools. They have different capacities on each end, so you can buy half as many as you'd otherwise need. First get a ½ fl. oz. / ¾ fl. oz. jigger.

$19, amazon.com

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And buy 1 fl. oz. / 2 fl. oz. jigger while you're at it.

$18, amazon.com

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Muddler

A muddler crushes tasty things to unlock their goodness, like mint leaves. Avoid anything varnished or otherwise coated. It'll come off in your drinks, and poisoning people has been frowned upon in the cocktail world since at least the 1930s.

$11, amazon.com

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Staple Spirits

The world's best bars don't use expensive base spirits. They use Rittenhouse Bonded Rye, Wild Turkey 101 Bourbon, Famous Grouse Blended Scotch, Bushmills Black Bush Irish Whiskey, Plymouth Gin, Bacardi 8 Rum, and Belvedere Vodka. Spare everyone the histrionics over vodka being an inferior replacement for gin. Whether you drink it or not, you will definitely serve people who prefer vodka, so stock it.Courtesy

Staple Mixers

Shop Q or Fever-Tree for tonic. Soda water is one area you can be not-picky; Q, Fever-Tree, Perrier, Topo Chico, Whole Foods 365, whatever gets the job done. Simple syrup, a 50-50 mixture of reduced cane sugar and water, is another base ingredient. Don't buy it, make it. We just gave you the recipe. From there, branch out into bitters, vermouth, and so on, based on the drinks you want to make.Courtesy

Cocktail Books

The PDT Cocktail Book by Jim Meehan; The Joy of Mixology by Gary Regan; Death & Co. by David Kaplan, Alex Day, and Nick Fauchald; and The Savoy Cocktail Book by Harry Craddock are all good introductions on how to mix drinks, and include lots of recipes. It never hurts to consult the experts. Courtesy